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To update the u-boot, Linux kernel and root file system images in NAND on your Overo COM, start with a bootable microSD card and follow the instructions in the Write Images to Flash section. If you need to create your own bootable microSD card, follow instructions to create a bootable microSD card step in the Getting Started Guide.

  • You can also use these images to boot from NAND. When writing to NAND, keep in mind the size limitations of the NAND roofs partition. In particular you will need to use omap3-desktop-nand-image rather than omap3-desktop-image.

If you just want to add some more software to your current image, check out the Add Software Package on the opkg package manager section.


Introduction to Cross Compilation

The following information explains how to set up a basic cross-compilation environment. These instructions are given for a Debian-based host system; however, they are similar for other Linux OS distributions.

  • If you need a customized root filesystem, or need to compile packages that have many dependencies, see the How To explaining the OpenEmbedded Build System.
  • If you need to rapidly iterate in developing a small piece of C/C++ code, check out the guide to native compilation on a Gumstix COM.

Cross Compilation Steps


Compile Native Code

Developing directly on Gumstix hardware (i.e. native compiling) simplifies small coding projects and projects that require frequent changes.

Likewise, if codes you wish to run on the COM do not have a Bitbake recipe, and you would rather compile directly from the source, try compiling it natively on a COM.  This article explains how to install native gcc/g++ on your COMs. Please note that the exact instructions depend on the operating system running on your COM.

For larger projects, you might consider cross-compilation or the OpenEmbedded Cross build system. 

Many standard software packages are available using the package manager built-in to your OS; for instructions on the opkg package manager for Angstrom, see this page.

Yocto Project

Angstrom

Ubuntu

Android

Test with Hello World and Kernel Module Sample


Compile Code from Kernel and Boot Loader from Source Code

All software for Gumstix COMs is freely available and open source. Gumstix also makes available the complete build system used to generate our release images and package repository.

Linux Kernel

u-boot

x-load

X-load has been superseded by the SPL bootloader built out of the u-boot code base.

Yocto Project

Gumstix uses the Yocto Project build system. While it is certainly possible to use other methods to build the boot loaders, kernel, and root file systems, we've found Yocto Project to be an attractive solution. Please see the Bitbake and Yocto Project section of this page on the Yocto project for more information about the Gumstix meta layer.

Compile from Source Code

Linux Kernel

Das U-Boot

Yocto Project

x-load